About your Search

20121202
20121210
STATION
MSNBCW 2
KGO (ABC) 1
WJZ (CBS) 1
WUSA (CBS) 1
LANGUAGE
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
? >> it is by the end of this week and here's why. republicans came out right after the election and said to the president, you want revenue, here. you want revenue on the wealthy? we will give it to you. let's do this via limbing tax deductions for the wealthy. the president instead of taking that, running it, ceiling a deal, has been out campaigning for tax hikes. and to cap it off, sent treasury secretary tim geithner down to congress this week with this absolutely outrageous proposal that's basically a compilation of everything the president wanted in his budget. it's beyond what he even campaigned for. and as a result i think most republicans wonder just how serious he is about doing this. they feel things are going backwards. >> that's the way it sounded to me, too. i talk to some senior republicans this week and they are increasingly of the belief that maybe the president wants to back them into a corner that could push them over the cliff and then be able to blame them if you have to recession or for taxes going up on everybody. >> well, i don't doubt that that's what he's trying
's one thing. but we're not going to go after seeing the president win this election, we won the white house, turn right around and undermine the people who helped put us there. >> you know, it is interesting. the older voters did vote republican and medicare was out there. i mean, paul ryan budget was there. and the older voters went for governor romney. >> remember,, he won with fewer voters. the republican performance was better than it was four years ago. the reality is, nobody can look at this budget and think that if you don't reform entitlements you can balance it. >> but it's a matter of where do you balance it? do you balance it on the backs on the people who can least afford it? >> but to get a deal, we have a divided government. the president won. we can argue about whether it's a mandate. there will have to be compromise. $16 trillion debt. trillion a year deficit. you're not going to solve all that with tax increases and cutting discretionary programs. we have to fix the intitlement programs. we can talk about how we do it. >> you have to be specific, steve. because when y
and treasury secretary timothy geithner. >> we are flabbergasted. we have seven weeks between election day in the end of the year. three of those weeks have been wasted. >> we are not going to extend an extension of the tax rates. we think they need to go back to those levels. if you don't do that, you have to ask yourself, whose taxes are we going to raise? were we going to find the money bring a balanced plan in place? jenna: senator lindsey graham, a republican known for reaching across the aisle, not looking at this with a great deal of optimism. >> i think we're going over the fiscal cliff. it's pretty clear that they have made this happen. they are not saving social security and medicare and medicaid from imminent bankruptcy. jenna: james is live in washington with more. reporter: yes, what is clear is increasingly, the two sides -- the obama, white house, senate democrats on one side, senate republicans on the other, there is a ticking clock involved here. they should be hitting their stride right about now. timothy geithner is trying to avoid plunging of the fiscal cliff. he has ma
just lost re-election and the eight or so seats. on the other hand, he still has a very diverse caucus in terms of ideology and it's going to be very difficult. you'll notice in hiss comments he didn't say no to 37%. that said, if he agreed to 37% and he's basically bilateral talks with the president, who says the kwaux is going to approve that. he could end up with a lot of egg on his face if he agrees with the president on this, they go forward with the vote, and it doesn't pass. >> david, the office of management and budget, omb, asking government agencies to figure out what they would cut if we do go over this fiscal cliff. talking a trillion dollars in cuts over ten years. that would mean furloughs for some federal workers, slower hiring, outside contracting, the closer we get to the cliff, the more real it begins to seem. how does that then change the negotiations? >> well, i think it's all part of the political pressure the white house is trying to apply to the congressional republicans. we saw the same thing in '11 when we had the near government shutdown and the dispute over t
the fiscal cliff. right after the election wall street dropped 5% when everybody suddenly focused on the fiscal cliff and realized that this was a problem. but since then it's kind of bumped along at this sort of level. i don't think wall street is at all sanguine about the idea that if we went over the fiscal cliff, life would go on as we know it and everything would be fine. >> one of the things that was really interesting to me to bear out that point is ken conrad yesterday who's been so down, i mean, he's leaving the senate. he's done this for seven years. they can't produce deals. and yesterday when i interviewed him, joe, he said i think we're going to make this. i think the boehner offer had significant indicators that something here is going on, and they're going to come together. >> also, kent conrad, a guy -- i've loved him for a long time, deficit hawk. they haven't allowed him to put a budget out for years. he's growing frustrated. i'm sure he's going to be glad to leave. but i was surprised by that as well. you see also, sam stein, republicans are now starting to real
right after the election was the speaker who went down and provided the revenue that's something you had not heard of before. when has this president offered any of the spending cuts? i think that's where the holdup is. >> it all started with the president putting an offer on the table late last week then speaker boehner last night so you would expect a counter offer to the counter offer from the white house. nope. inside the white house they are saying they don't take boehner's plan seriously enough to each do some sort of a counter offer. that's where we are tonight. neither side wants to put a new plan on the table. they are making progress right now. >> shepard: ed henry at the white house. the president may reach across the party line. former republic senator chuck killing a is on the short list to replace leon pa net attachment the nomination will come in the next two weeks along with the president's pick for secretary of state. on that matter the u.n. ambassador susan rice is considered a likely choice to replace secretary clinton. today president obama expressed confidence in her
politicians do. the republicans lost the election. they know they're going to have to raise revenues. but i think the over-hyping of deficits the deficit mania that seized this town, is kind of crazy. i mean, i love alan simpson and erskine bowles, but they're talking about inflation at a moment when people are paying us money to invest in our treasury bonds. you know, the summer before last, when we had the debt ceiling negotiations, and everybody was saying oh, our credit is about to go down the tubes. the price of u.s. treasury bonds were going up. so the fact is that we have a problem. i'm hoping that we'll deal with it especially, you know, the old age entitlementes, because sooner or later you and i are going to be old enough to qualify for medicare, and we're going to at the present time to be a good system. but we i think a little rationality is called for. >> schieffer: you're saying it's not as bad as it seems. the fact of the matter swhen the bush tax cuts run out at the end of the year, when payroll tax-- whatever they call it, runs out at the end of the year, people's taxes are
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)